Home Page  
 
 

Six Moral Tales, II: Suzanne' Career
SPECIFICATIONS
  • 1.37:1 Standard
  • French PCM Mono
  • English subtitles
  • 1 Disc
FEATURES
  • Rohmer's short film Nadja in Paris (1964)

Six Moral Tales, II: Suzanne' Career

Blu-ray
Reviewed by: Chris Galloway

Directed By: Eric Rohmer
1963 | 55 Minutes | Licensor: Les Films du Losange

Release Information
Blu-ray | MSRP: $99.95 | Series: The Criterion Collection
Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Release Date: May 5, 2020
Review Date: May 4, 2020

Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca

Share:

SYNOPSIS

Bertrand bides his time in a casually hostile and envious friendship with college chum Guillaume. But when ladies' man Guillaume seems to be making a play for the spirited, independent Suzanne, Bertrand watches bitterly with disapproval and jealousy. With its ragged black-and-white 16mm photography and strong sense of 1960s Paris, Rohmer's second Moral Tale is a wonderfully evocative portrait of youthful naivetť and the complicated bonds of friendship and romance.


PICTURE

Criterion upgrades their Six Moral Tales DVD box set to Blu-ray, presenting Eric Rohmerís six films over three dual-layer discs. The second film, Suzanneís Career, is found on the first disc with The Bakery Girl of Monceau and is presented in its original aspect ratio of 1.37:1.

Criterion makes use of a new restoration performed in 2K and sourced from the 16mm original camera negative. There are a number of improvements with this new presentation, the most notable being the removal of splices that plagued the image on the DVD edition. Every cut showed a giant splice at the top and/or bottom along with a jump in the frame, which got incredibly distracting. This presentation also removes many tram lines and other marks, though a few are scattered about still. The image is also far more stable, not jumping around or pulsing like what the DVD offered.

The film also ends up being far grainier than what the DVD showed (I suspect the grain was managed through noise reduction on the DVD as it probably would have been a mess otherwise), though this is both good and not-so-good. This allows for better detail in most cases, as well as a cleaner, more film-like image, but there are moments where the grain looks blockier and more digital in nature.

In the end an improvement in a number of areas, but the incredibly grainy nature of the film doesnít seem to translate well digitally.

7/10

All Blu-ray screen captures come from the source disc and have been shrunk from 1920x1080 to 900x506 and slightly compressed to conserve space. While they are not exact representations they should offer a general idea of overall video quality.

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

Screen Capture

AUDIO

The film comes with a simple French monaural track presented in lossless PCM. Dialogue and sound effects still have a detached, hollow sound to them, which may be a byproduct of the fact it was all looped during post-production, but the track is clean, free of severe damage, and a hiss found on the DVDís track is less noticeable.

5/10

SUPPLEMENTS

The supplements are spread out between the films over the three discs. Suzanneís Career still only comes with one feature, Rohmerís Nadja in Paris. The 13-minute film features an American/Yugoslav student in Paris, who talks about the city through voice-over while she ventures through it, visiting locations like the Sorbonne. She talks about the architecture, shops, and the diversity of its population. Though it appears to be a travelogue on the surface, it is more of a character study, the city having helped her find herself and figure out the person that she is.

Criterion is also reusing the same digital master that was presented on the DVD, and it does not upscale well here, looking heavily processed and playing with a jerky, choppy motion, almost as if there were issues with the framerate during the conversion.

And yet again, like the DVD, thereís nothing else to speak of, not even specific to this film.

3/10

CLOSING

No features around the film but the presentation is an improvement, even if the grain can look a bit wonky.




Share: 



Purchase From:
amazon.com  amazon.ca  




Join our Facebook Group (requires Facebook account)

This site is not affiliated with The Criterion Collection