Alfred Hitchcock

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Mr Sausage
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Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 9:02 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#326 Post by Mr Sausage » Sat May 25, 2019 9:59 pm

I'm not a fan of Harry. Here's my brief reaction to it in the Hitchcock List thread.
I wrote:What a tedious movie. I suppose I can't blame Hitchcock as much as the script, tho' why he'd choose a script so hokey, unfunny, and full of hoary cliches (is there really a whole scene of people happening to wander by one random location in the woods all at the same time while an old man soliloquizes from behind a tree?) is beyond me. It's a narrative of endless scenes of uninteresting people talking archly at each other (sometimes in admittedly beautiful scenery). This vies with Topaz as my least favourite Hitchcock.

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domino harvey
Dot Com Dom
Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2006 2:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#327 Post by domino harvey » Sat May 25, 2019 10:21 pm

bottled spider wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 9:46 pm
domino harvey wrote:
Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:44 pm
ASMR for lonely Hitchcock fans (SFW, but you’re going to get weird looks regardless)
I almost fell off my chair laughing when she shushed me. And then she brings out... the popcorn. And we all know what she's going to do with it, don't we? That's right. Eat it. With her mouth open.

The script is unparalleled:
Oh you're so dreamy. So, so dreamy. I mean come on, straight from the fridge, all the girls love you. But you chose to go out on a date with me. Why?
That vibrates me. That vibrates me a lot.
.
.
.
I'm just glad this night didn't end with us screwed, blued, and tattooed.
So, what you're revealing is that you watched the whole thing

Image

I suspect she used Straight From the Fridge, Dad, a book of "hep slang," mostly influenced by or originating in black culture spanning from the twenties into the fifties, the majority of which was probably about as prevalent in actual day to day 50s life as "deck" or "fetch" was ten years ago. I used to use the book with my students for a fun daily vocab thing, though, and they loved it.

Honestly, if this video gets some preteen/teen fans of ASMR Darling to watch Rear Window (which, based on her comments, she does appear to at least have had on in the same room that she filmed this, despite the royalty-free music she overlaid), it will have served a greater purpose beyond allowing young people to engage in some mild fantasy dating roleplay. I also enjoyed the YT comment from a black viewer who expressed his inability to relax while watching as he knew a date with a white woman in the 50s wasn't going to go unnoticed!

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bottled spider
Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 2:59 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#328 Post by bottled spider » Sat May 25, 2019 10:47 pm

No, honest, I skipped ahead to the end to see how it finished... honestly...

But wait a second... how did YOU know that was the last line of the clip???

dda1996a
Joined: Tue Oct 27, 2015 6:14 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#329 Post by dda1996a » Sun May 26, 2019 12:22 am

On the other hand, I was sure The Wrong Man was on course to becoming my favorite film of all time, not just Hitchcock's. I saw some people complaining on it's seriousness, but I found Hitch's themes being given the neo-realism once over, while also feeling like the sequel to Bresson's brilliant A Man Escaped had me floored. Fonda couldn't be a better casting, and I swear I could have watched their family life for another hour. But then goes full "end of Psycho" pop psychology, diverting the movie to the most unnecessary sub plot ever that I lost interest immediately. Just goes to show how sticking slavishly to real life facts could ruin a movie completely.

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dustybooks
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:52 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#330 Post by dustybooks » Sun Aug 11, 2019 11:12 am

Upon finally seeing the silent Blackmail and Mary (the German Murder!) through the new KL releases, I found myself a little underwhelmed -- somewhat predictably in the latter case, as Hitchcock himself outlined the problems with that film: it's terribly rushed, further obscures one of the main plot points that was already coded in euphemism in the English version (
SpoilerShow
Handel Fane is not gay or bisexual, as anyone watching the film today will assume and as Hitchcock agreed when talking about Murder!, nor is he a "half-caste," the actual given reason for the scandal in the familiar version of the film; he is, as stated in the very last moments, an escaped convict!
), and almost entirely drops the humor and characterization that gave the story flavor with the original cast, rendering it surprisingly generic and pointless apart from the sets and camera work. Alfred Abel is off-putting in the Herbert Marshall role, as you can imagine if you know both actors' work well.

It's conventional wisdom I know, including here, that Blackmail is far superior as a silent film. But perhaps because I've known and loved the talkie for so many years now, i couldn't help missing the narrative innovations. It's not that different in most respects, but it felt a little ponderous to me -- especially in the sequences with Calthrop as the blackmailer -- and unlike Lucas on the commentary, I didn't think the breakfast scene was nearly as effective without the "knife" trick, and I felt Cyril Ritchard was a bit less of a memorably eccentric horror without his weird piano routine. Chances are, though, that with my expectations tempered I will like the silent version more when I revisit, and I'm grateful to finally have it on the shelf, and glad I waited to be able to see it in its full BFI-restored glory.

Incidentally, I think I've now seen everything Hitchcock directed except the two Free French shorts, two of the three hour-long TV shows, and maybe some of his bits in Elstree Calling (a piece of which is on Youtube, but I'm not sure if that's all of his contribution). Oh, and The Mountain Eagle, Number 13 and An Elastic Affair, of course.

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DeprongMori
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 1:59 am
Location: San Francisco

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#331 Post by DeprongMori » Sun Aug 11, 2019 4:04 pm

Incidentally, I think I've now seen everything Hitchcock directed except the two Free French shorts...
The Eureka release of Lifeboat contains the two Free French shorts (with commentary).

barnyard078
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 5:37 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#332 Post by barnyard078 » Sun Aug 11, 2019 6:26 pm

Image Entertainment also released the Free French shorts on an older DVD back in 1998. There are third party sellers on Amazon that are selling them, currently. The quality will be inferior to the Eureka Lifeboat release, but just putting it out there.

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dustybooks
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2007 10:52 am
Location: Wilmington, NC

Re: Alfred Hitchcock

#333 Post by dustybooks » Sun Aug 11, 2019 7:16 pm

I appreciate it. The Eureka Lifeboat is on my list and I have access to the Image disc through the library, but I have to admit I've kind of delayed them because I don't want to be completely out of Hitchcock, as silly as it sounds. I finally watched "Incident at a Corner" last year and keep procrastinating on "Four O'Clock" and "I Saw the Whole Thing."

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