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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 11:38 am 
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diamonds wrote:

Image


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 5:28 pm 

Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 3:04 pm
Not sure how to explain, but even with the familiar Anderson trademarks this does have a different look visually. Kind of rough around the edges (the plot partially contributing).


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 8:42 pm 
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It's definitely a darker, more boldly dystopian world than anything he's ever done; something of a departure from the oft-stereotyped poppy pastel stylization of his past films. The futuristic setting here also stands in contrast to the nostalgia that permeates much of his work. Glad to see he's continuing to challenge himself within the confines of his style, adapting it to the Academy ratio in Budapest and here with another foray into stop-motion.

The blankness of the backgrounds in some of the shots of the island reminded me a bit of Isao Takahata's animation style with its stark, "unfinished" sketches, which also might contribute to that "rough around the edges" feeling.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 21, 2017 11:22 pm 
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This is stupid of me, and it's probably too tenuous to actually be a reference, but when the female character talks about the boy stealing a "Junior turbo prop XJ-750..." I couldn't help but think of the song "Sy Borg" on Frank Zappa's album "Joe's Garage." The police arrest Joe because he has destroyed a "model XQJ-37 nuclear powered pan-sexual roto-plooker." Again: tenuous at best. But the X and the J in the model number sparked a connection in my one-track Zappa mind.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:17 pm 
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PG-13 for "thematic elements and violent images"


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 3:25 pm 
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First clip


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 5:53 pm 
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2nd clip...watch it a 2nd time with the sound turned off


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:59 pm 
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There will be another installment in the wonderful Wes Anderson Collection series of books to cover this film, this time not written by Matt Zoller Seitz (who is contributing a forward) but by critic Lauren Wilford and filmmaker Ryan Stevenson; it's releasing in May.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 10:52 am 
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Wes Anderson explains how Hayao Miyazaki inspired Isle of Dogs.
Quote:
[Miyazaki] brings the detail and also the silences I think... With Miyazaki you get nature and you get moments of peace, a kind of rhythm that is not in the American animation tradition so much. That inspired us quite a lot. There were times when I worked with [composer] Alexandre Desplat on the score and we found many places where we had to pull back from what we were doing musically because the movie wanted to be quiet. That came from Miyazaki.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:26 pm 
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Reviews I'm seeing out of Berlinale have all been really good. The impression being that Anderson has crafted a great (And very Pro-Dog) film. A quick Google search should bring up some of the impressions/reviews.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:21 pm 
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Perhaps Anderson developed this film partly in response to critics who accused him—after the fate of Snoopy in Moonrise Kingdom and the rather unflattering portrayal of the guard dogs in Fantastic Mr. Fox, etc.—of being anti-dog. :-"


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 10:19 pm 
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whaleallright wrote:
Perhaps Anderson developed this film partly in response to critics who accused him—after the fate of Snoopy in Moonrise Kingdom and the rather unflattering portrayal of the guard dogs in Fantastic Mr. Fox, etc.—of being anti-dog. :-"

Don't forget the dog in Royal Tenanbaums!


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